2017: A Year In Books

As I did last year, I wanted to recap my reading from 2017 in a single post, and mention books I thought really stood out to me. I have been reading exclusively books in the M/M Romance genre because I find them extremely enjoyable. I have a gut reaction to try to defend this statement and the genre, but that’s silly. I think these books immensely rewarding, and they contain some of the finest writing I have ever come across in any genre. Finally, I note these are books I read in 2017, but are not limited to books published in 2017. To start off, we have the statistics:

Out of 110 books read, my Goodreads ratings were:
Did Not Finish – 4
1 out of 5 – 0
2 out of 5 – 3
3 out of 5 – 14
4 out of 5 – 53
5 out of 5 – 36

As I noted previously, the low number of stinkers have a lot to do with the fact that I have a low-water mark of a 3.65 rating on Goodreads (with at least 100 reviews) – anything with a rating under that had better have an amazing blurb to get me to read it. Of the books I did not finish, two were Just That Awful and two were “It’s not you, it’s me.” (i.e. probably good books, but not to my tastes at all).

Enough of the bad, let’s talk about the good.

The hurt/comfort trope, in which the physical or mental distress of one character is eased by another character, is a common one in fiction. An extreme example of this is Aaron, by J.P. Barnaby. I am glad that I listened to this audiobook because reading the physical book would have been difficult. It tells the story of Aaron, a recovering survivor of sexual abuse and violence, as he struggles to come out of the protective shell he and his family have created. He meets Spencer, a deaf man who is trying to make his way in a hearing world. The interactions between the two and their families are an incredible story. The description of what happened to Aaron is harrowing, and the author makes us understand what it is to deal with the aftermath. The audiobook is performed by Tyler Stevens, and he nails the characters and the overall tone of the book perfectly. This one is simply a stunner.

The hurt/comfort trope is also prevalent in Alex Jane’s Home Is Where You Are. The story takes place in an alternate-history Nebraska in the 1870’s. It gave me warm, fuzzy feelings and not just because of the werewolves who are the main characters. Caleb is a former Union soldier. He left his family behind abruptly when he went off to war, and saw and survived the absolute worst. Now, years later, he lives an isolated life, fighting PTSD and barely tolerated by his neighbors. Jacob’s arrival changes all of that. There is a quality to this writing that I enjoyed – matter-of-fact in describing about the harsh realities of hardscrabble life in the Great Plains, but also showing thoughtful insight into the main characters. All three of the books that are out now are great (Returning Home and Longing for Shelter, with a fourth book on the way).

In another alternate history, Hexslayer, by Jordan L. Hawk, takes us to New York City at the turn of the twentieth century. This is the third book in the Hexworld series, and takes place in a world of policemen who use magic in conjunction with their shapeshifting familiars. There is so much to love here – the gloomy atmosphere, the steadily mounting narrative tension, and in Jamie and Nick two intriguing characters. Several narrative threads from previous books start to come together here in a satisfying way that left me looking forward to more.

Moving into the present day, the Guardsman series by Cooper West (The Protector and Parker’s Sanctuary) brings us to an alternate reality similar to our own, but where a very small percentage of the population become Guardsman, a weredog (“Protector”) and a human “Handler” who share a mental bond. West has created a world of remarkable detail here, and the populated it with memorable characters. The descriptions of how Protectors and Handlers are represented in popular culture are clever, and follow logically. These are well-written and I look forward to the next book.

N.R. Walker’s The Weight of It All, on the other hand, is firmly rooted in the reality of the here and now, albeit in Australia (which I am told exists…). This is a lovely story of a guy who gets dumped because he’s too fat, so he joins a gym and falls for his trainer. This is a gross oversimplification of a sweet, hilariously funny book that is written with sensitivity and empathy. Henry is a guy who creates a wall of self-deprecating humor and isolation around himself to hide his lack of self-esteem. Reed, his trainer, is the perfect foil for Henry – serious, at times nonplussed, but slowly falling for Henry as the walls Henry has built start to fall. Joel Leslie performs the audiobook brilliantly. The tremulous emotion that Leslie’s voice carries as Henry agonizes over his life is heartbreaking; the elation in Henry’s successes is thrilling and contagious. This is by far the best audiobook I listened to this year!

Finally, we get to the favorite book that I read in 2017: G.L. Carriger’s The Sumage Solution. Carriger has created a fun world here. The supernatural is commonplace, with shifters, magicians, and kitsune all sharing space in a modern-day San Francisco. We learn about the laws that bind the place and how magic works as we go, so not a lot of time is wasted on exposition. The ending is telegraphed far ahead, but this was a case where even if you knew where you’re going, you’re still going to enjoy the ride. The best part of the book is the characters, though. Max is a guy who has been through a lot but still maintains a snarky wit. Bryan is a complete sweetheart and a gentle giant. They make a great couple, and make this a supremely satisfying story.

It was difficult to select the just top six books. I want to give honorable mention to some of the other really great books I read (links are to the reviews I wrote): Breaker, by Kelly Wyre and A.F. Henley; Lord Mouse, by Mason Thomas; Murmuration, by T.J. Klune; and Finder’s Keeper, by Shira Anthony.

I wanted to also single out a couple of other books for a different reason. Some, but not all, M/M romances veer into the territory of erotica. Werewolves of Chernobyl by K.A. Merikan and The Protection of the Pack series by Dessa Lux are both SMOKING hot, but at the same time have wonderful narrative wit and don’t take themselves too seriously. They’re really fun reads.

Looking ahead to 2018, I have at least a dozen books I’ve purchased but haven’t read yet, and at least another hundred books on my to-read list. I’ve got enough to keep me busy for a while!

1 thought on “2017: A Year In Books

  1. Pingback: Book Review: Ghost of a Chance (Requiem Inc. #1), by Kris T. BethkeTom Brady's Blog | Tom Brady's Blog

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