Monthly Archives: June 2018

Book Review: Locked in Silence, by Sloane Kennedy

Ten years after leaving his small Minnesota hometown in his rearview mirror for what Nolan Grainger was sure would be the last time, life has decided to throw the talented musician a curveball and send him back to the town he lived in but was never really home.

At twenty-eight, Nolan has traveled the world as a successful concert violinist with some of the best symphonies in the country. But success breeds envy, and when Nolan’s benefactor and lover decides Nolan has flown high enough, he cruelly clips Nolan’s wings. The betrayal and ensuing scandal leaves the violinist’s career in shambles and with barely enough money to start fresh somewhere beyond his vindictive ex’s powerful reach. But just as he’s ready to get his life back on track, Nolan gets the call he’s been dreading.

After a stroke leaves his father a partial invalid, duty-bound Nolan returns to Pelican Bay and a life he’s spent years trying to forget. When he’s forced to use the last of his own money to keep from losing the family home, desperation has him turning to the one man he’d hoped never to see again…

Pelican Bay’s golden boy, Dallas Kent, had the quintessential perfect life. Smart, gorgeous, and popular, the baseball phenom was well on his way to a life filled with fame and fortune. But more importantly, he had a one-way ticket out of Pelican Bay and far away from the family who used love as currency and whose high expectations were the law of the land. But a stormy night, sharp highway curve and one bad decision changed everything, leaving Dallas with nothing.

Because the accident that took his parents, his future and his crown as the boy who could do no wrong, also stole his voice. Despised for the horrific wreck that ended the lives of two of Pelican Bay’s most respected residents, Dallas has retreated to a secluded stretch of land where he’s found refuge in a menagerie of unwanted animals that don’t care that he once had the world at his feet or that he’ll never speak again.

But when the quiet, bookish boy he wasn’t allowed to notice in school suddenly reappears ten years later at Dallas’s wildlife rehab center in desperate need of a job, Dallas is thrust back into a world he’s worked hard to escape. Dallas’s silence was supposed to send Nolan scurrying, but what if Nolan ends up being the one person who finally hears him? Will two men who’ve been fleeing from the past finally come home to Pelican Bay for good or will the silence drive them apart forever?

Locked in Silence (Pelican Bay #1), by Sloane Kennedy

Rating: 4.75 out of 5

Wow, I found so much to love about this book! Nolan and Dallas are such rich, complex characters, and watching the interplay between them melted my heart. They both proud men who have had everything taken from them. Seeing them strive to retain and regain dignity really struck a chord with me.

That’s one heck of a long blurb, and really it pretty much lays out the majority of the story for you. Given that this is a character-driven book, though, that’s OK. There’s a lot of themes explored here, especially bullying, relationships between parents and children, how to deal with old wounds (both physical and emotional), and redemption. Kennedy handles these well, and they help creates the layers of the characters’ personalities.

Nolan’s meteoric rise after escaping his hated hometown speaks to a gifted child’s huge aspirations, and it makes his abrupt downfall and return that much more painful. I really felt for Nolan and the bullying he endured. Dallas’ own fall from grace takes place off-page, but his isolation and loneliness shows through. He struggles to make himself heard and understood, but when he speaks to Nolan from his heart the communication barriers fall away.

The small town of Pelican Bay is a bit stereotypical, and the antagonists may as well be twirling their mustaches and cackling in evil glee, but that’s a minor nitpick since the focus of the story is on Nolan and Dallas. Toward the end the pacing of the story stumbles a bit as new characters are introduced and the setup for the sequel is put into place, but even so those new characters are intriguing in their own right, and you’re damn right I’ve already bought the next book! The ending of the Locked in Silence had me in happy tears, which is always a good sign that the author has done a wonderful job.

This is a great contemporary novel about two complicated, caring men who have their own struggles but find that they are stronger together. I happily recommend this one!

Book Review: Under a Blue Moon (Camp H.O.W.L. #2), by Bru Baker

Nick Perry is tired of helping people with their marriages, so when a spot opens up to work with teens at Camp H.O.W.L., he jumps at it. He doesn’t expect to fall in lust with the dreamy new camp doctor, Drew Welch. But Drew is human, and Nick has seen secrets ruin too many relationships to think that a human/werewolf romance can go anywhere.

Happy-go-lucky Drew may not sprout claws, but he’s been part of the Were community all his life. He has no trouble fitting in at the camp—except for Nick’s stubborn refusal to acknowledge the growing attraction between them and his ridiculous stance on dating humans. Fate intervenes when one of his private practice patients threatens Drew’s life. Will the close call help Nick to see a connection like theirs isn’t something to let go of?

Under a Blue Moon (Camp H.O.W.L. #2), by Bru Baker

Rating: 4.0 out of 5

Normally when I review books in a series I’ll only review the first book, on the assumption that there are characters, settings, or references from the first book that make later books difficult to enjoy without having read the books in order. In this case, I’m starting with book 2 for two reasons: one, that with the exception of throwaway references to side characters, this can be read first, and two, the second book is really so much better than the first!

In this world, werewolves are in a parallel but hidden part of modern society. A small number of humans know of the existence of werewolves, usually those adopted into packs. The first transition from human to wolf normally occurs around puberty, and its effects on emotions and self-control are just as dire as puberty itself. Posh camps like Camp H.O.W.L. exist in remote areas to help teens from more affluent families ease through their first change.

This is a fun setting, and the focus here is on the Camp H.O.W.L. staff. The sparks between Nick and Drew fly from the very first pages of the book, but there is an interesting tension because Drew is ready for a serious relationship, but Nick feels that humans are werewolves are just too different and a relationship is destined for failure.

The characters are what really won me over in this book. Nick is a psychologist who is damn good at his job, but tends to see everything through the lens of his professional opinions. He’s never provided counseling to a human/werewolf couple, but has for many human couples and where huge differences exist the relationships fail. Drew is a complicated guy with a checkered sexual history. He’s also generous and patient, and willing to wait for Nick to work through his hangups.

I have a few minor complaints about the ending of the book but overall, I really enjoyed it. Great setting, great characters, and a couple of very sexy scenes too! This is a great read for some low-angst werewolf fun.

Book Review: Night of the Living Manny, by Julia Talbot

Manny Brenden Torrance is good at his job. He’s dealt with all sorts of children and parents, but he’s never met anyone as intriguing as Liam Whitehouse. Liam is a scientist with three kids, whose job is keeping him away from home more and more. That’s where Brenden steps in to help.

Liam has secrets, though. He’s working on a project for a pharmaceutical lab that could change disease management. Or destroy it. While he and Brenden start a romance they both want to continue, things at Liam’s job come to a head, and suddenly the whole family of Dad, manny, three kids, and a big drooly dog is on the run from the one thing that might keep Brenden and Liam apart. And infect the world.

Night of the Living Manny, by Julia Talbot

Rating: 3.25 out of 5

I’ll start this by saying I have never been one for horror of any kind, including zombie books and movies. The suspense and jump-scares drive my anxiety way up, and I have absolutely no stomach for gore of any kind. So this puts some of my criticisms of this book into the “It’s not you, it’s me” category. If I didn’t have a subscription to the Dreamspun Beyond line I’m really nto sure I would have picked this up on its own.

To the good, I am a complete sucker for Julia Talbot’s writing. I’ve loved her Nose to Tail, Inc. books (Wolfmanny is pure comfort food), and I thought Fangs and Catnip was adorable. Some say her style can be a bit choppy, but I think it matches the way people think and talk, so it works for me. I really liked the characters of Liam and Brenden, though we get a much better picture of the latter than the former. The kids are relegated to smaller roles but we know enough about them that everything fits together.

I think my fundamental problem with this book is that it is limited by the Dreamspun Beyond line itself, which is geared to light and fluffy paranormal romances with happily-ever-afters. Not exactly a good fit for a zombie-outbreak book, in my opinion. By necessity the important but gritty details get glossed over. We spend almost half the book on the setup, then the second half moves entirely too quickly, both in the zombie storyline and in the romance between Liam and Brenden, who profess enduring love after only a few weeks of knowing one another.

So I’m left in a weird place: maybe double the length of the book and give all of these elements the time they are due, but in doing you’d have a book I’d have pretty much zero interest in (and may need a different publisher completely). Go figure.

This is a quick read, and Talbot’s writing is always engaging. If the synopsis sounds like something you’d enjoy then give this one a shot. It just didn’t work for me.