Monthly Archives: December 2017

Scenes from Christmas Eve

http://wolfhusky.net/duncan/wp/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/img_0957.mov

On a happier note, here are some pics I took this evening. That’s Basilique Norte Dame de Montréal, and a Christmas-themed bar that was cute but ridiculously overpriced. For the rest, Vieux Montréal is a bit of a tourist trap, but they sure can create an amazing atmosphere. My favorite part of the night: the skating rink at the Old Port in Montréal. The music was just perfect, too.

Christmas in Montréal

I was navigating the slushy sidewalks of Vieux Montréal and saw a couple walk past holding hands. I thought of how doing that with Dan would have been lovely, how we would have supported each other as we slipped and slid through the snow.

And then I was sobbing.

I don’t regret coming here. My goal was to get away for a few days to a neutral location: one without the baggage of Christmas with family or someplace that Dan and I had traveled where I wouldn’t be re-living the time that we spent there. For the most part it has worked. I’ve kept myself distracted and generally had an OK time. Tonight, though, I was reminded that you can only distract yourself for so long. The memories and the grief will catch up with you. I’ll survive, but it really took the wind out of my sails for the night.

I like the idea of traveling somewhere new at Christmas each year. Perhaps next time it will be someplace warmer, or where I have friends, or where the whole freakin’ city doesn’t shut down starting on Christmas Eve.

Book Review: The Storm Lords, by Ravon Silvius

The heat took everything from Rowen: his parents, his voice when the local cure for heatstroke poisoned him, and the trust of his fellow villagers, who branded him a water thief. It would have claimed his life when he was deemed unworthy of precious resources and left in the sun to die, had not a strange man named Kristoff ridden in on the wind and told Rowen he had power.

Rowen works hard to become a Storm Lord, one of a secret magical group that brings storms to break the heat waves overtaking their world. But Rowen is starting his training at a disadvantage since he cannot speak and is much older than the other novices. The desire to please Kristoff inspires him to persevere even more than the threat of being sent back to his village to die should he fail. Still, he cannot gather rain, and when his abilities manifest, they are unlike anything known to the Storm Lords. Unless Kristoff can help him control his deadly powers, the entire world will be in danger.

Kristoff might be among the mightiest of the Storm Lords, but he’s never been a mentor before. For a chance to be with Rowen, he’s willing to risk everything.

The Storm Lords, by Ravon Silvius

Rating: 3.75 out of 5

I liked this book but I didn’t love it. There is a fantastic bit of world-building going on here. I really enjoyed that part. The abilities of the Storm Lords were fascinating and the meteorological science behind it all was reasonable to this non-expert. I could see how a lot of that could be a turnoff for others but hey – I’m an engineer and this is how I think anyway.

My problems with this book lay with the characters, I think. We get an understanding of Rowen and where he is coming from early on. I liked his tenacity and willingness to persevere through the worst hardships, and I also liked how the author showed the effects of his struggles on Rowen when he was suddenly somewhere where water was abundant. Kristoff is the one I had more problems with. The depth of his emotions for Rowen seemed out of sync with the short time that they spent together. There didn’t seem to be much as I would have liked in his backstory that explained why he fell in love so quickly.

I did like the logical conclusion that the story reached, and this allowed me to see past some of the flaws previously in the story. I’d recommend this one for an enjoyable read, and maybe another reader can get more out of it than I did.

Fangs and Catnip (Dead and Breakfast #1), by Julia Talbot


Solitary vampire Fallon Underwood gets all the social interaction he needs being the silent partner at the Dead and Breakfast B and B high in the Colorado mountains. Change is hard for Fallon, so when his business partner, Tanner, suggests hiring a new manager for the inn, he’s adamant that they don’t need help, especially not in the form of bouncy werecat Carter Hughes.

Carter is a happy-go-lucky kitty, and he loves the hospitality industry, so the D and B ought to be a great place for him. He falls for Fallon as soon as he picks up one of Fallon’s novels and begins to woo the vamp with gifts. When Fallon finally succumbs to Carter’s feline charms, the results are unexpected, to say the least. Their mating will have irreversible consequences-for their bodies and their hearts.

Fangs and Catnip (Dead and Breakfast #1), by Julia Talbot

Rating: 4 out of 5

This book is another entry into Dreamspinner Press’ “Dreamspun Beyond” line, which I’ve seen described as “addictive paranormal fluff.” Yeah, that about sums it up. This doesn’t make it a bad thing, though! Sometimes you want something cozy and enjoyable, that leaves the angst at the door. This is something that Julia Talbot excels at, as I found in the previous book of hers I read and reviewed, Wolfmanny.

The world-building here is minimal, except that we learn that all manner of paranormal beasties, from weres to vampires to demons to gorgons, are rather commonplace. The action takes a B&B called Dead and Breakfast (fortunately the other puns are kept to a minimum), located in the Colorado mountains. Tanner and Fallon co-own the B&B. They are good friends but not lovers, although it is hinted that they may have tried something earlier but found they made better friends than lovers.

I found Carter to be simply adorable. He’s smart, industrious, and loves his job. His inner monologue cracked me up, too. Here he’s trying to contain his excitement during the job interview:

“Carter Hughes?” Tanner shook hands, warm and firm but not squeezy. “I’m Tanner Weiling.”

“Mr. Weiling, pleased to meet you.”

No bouncing.
None.
Zero.
Be the antibounce.

This is a lovely story of opposites attracting, and Fallon and Carter are very sweet together. Although there isn’t a whole lot of drama in the book, both show character growth through the story. This really helped me feel invested in them, and I teared up a few times reading this. And as an aside, Talbot writes some dang hot sex scenes!

I want to note also that the secondary characters here are just lovely, and really make me look forward to future books in the series: Tanner, an affable werebear; Tom, a werewolf with his own problems who still looks out for Carter; Jami, the erstwhile vampire night auditor. I love the idea of seeing any of these guys in the next book.

Fangs and Catnip is an enjoyable, cozy book with great characters. I recommend this one, particularly for curling up and reading on a cold winter night!