Book Review: Night of the Living Manny, by Julia Talbot

Manny Brenden Torrance is good at his job. He’s dealt with all sorts of children and parents, but he’s never met anyone as intriguing as Liam Whitehouse. Liam is a scientist with three kids, whose job is keeping him away from home more and more. That’s where Brenden steps in to help.

Liam has secrets, though. He’s working on a project for a pharmaceutical lab that could change disease management. Or destroy it. While he and Brenden start a romance they both want to continue, things at Liam’s job come to a head, and suddenly the whole family of Dad, manny, three kids, and a big drooly dog is on the run from the one thing that might keep Brenden and Liam apart. And infect the world.

Night of the Living Manny, by Julia Talbot

Rating: 3.25 out of 5

I’ll start this by saying I have never been one for horror of any kind, including zombie books and movies. The suspense and jump-scares drive my anxiety way up, and I have absolutely no stomach for gore of any kind. So this puts some of my criticisms of this book into the “It’s not you, it’s me” category. If I didn’t have a subscription to the Dreamspun Beyond line I’m really nto sure I would have picked this up on its own.

To the good, I am a complete sucker for Julia Talbot’s writing. I’ve loved her Nose to Tail, Inc. books (Wolfmanny is pure comfort food), and I thought Fangs and Catnip was adorable. Some say her style can be a bit choppy, but I think it matches the way people think and talk, so it works for me. I really liked the characters of Liam and Brenden, though we get a much better picture of the latter than the former. The kids are relegated to smaller roles but we know enough about them that everything fits together.

I think my fundamental problem with this book is that it is limited by the Dreamspun Beyond line itself, which is geared to light and fluffy paranormal romances with happily-ever-afters. Not exactly a good fit for a zombie-outbreak book, in my opinion. By necessity the important but gritty details get glossed over. We spend almost half the book on the setup, then the second half moves entirely too quickly, both in the zombie storyline and in the romance between Liam and Brenden, who profess enduring love after only a few weeks of knowing one another.

So I’m left in a weird place: maybe double the length of the book and give all of these elements the time they are due, but in doing you’d have a book I’d have pretty much zero interest in (and may need a different publisher completely). Go figure.

This is a quick read, and Talbot’s writing is always engaging. If the synopsis sounds like something you’d enjoy then give this one a shot. It just didn’t work for me.